Spine Therapy

  • Physical therapy helped 92 percent of patients with low back pain. (Spine, July 2008)
  • Physical therapy treatment with stabilizing exercises is more effective in reducing pain intensity and disability than physician consultation alone. (Spine, 2003)
  • Hands on physical therapy speeds recovery following injuries – e.g. low back pain, emphasizing the need for early access to physical therapy and intervention. (Annals of Internal Medicine, Major John Childs)
  • Physical therapy as primary management for back pain produced results as favorable as those by junior orthopedic surgeons but generated lower direct hospital costs. (Journal of Epidemiol Community Health, October, 1999)
  • Manual therapy with spinal mobilization is more effective and less costly for treating neck pain than exercise oriented physical therapy or care by a general practitioner. Clinical outcomes were perceived recovery, intensity of pain, functional disability and quality of life. Costs were measured by diaries kept by patients for one year. (BMJ, April 2003)
  • Treatment of instability and spondylolisthesis should begin with nonoperative measures that may include physical therapy, aerobic exercises, epidural steroid injections and homeopathic remedies. (Clinical Orthopedics Relat Res., 2006)
  • In the management of lumbar degenerative disc disease it was found that physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the cornerstones of nonsurgical treatment. (Knoxville Orthopedic Clinic, 2009)
  • Evidence for reversal of disk prolapse with repeated extension maneuvers. (Spine, 2009)
  • In a study regarding mechanical neck pain it was found that a manual physical therapy and exercise program resulted in clinically significant short and long-term improvements in pain, disability and patient perceived recovery. (Spine, 2008)
  • In a study regarding the non-surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, it was found most effective non-surgical treatment is a comprehensive combination of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy and conditioning and epidural steroid injections. (Department of Orthopedics, West Virginia University School of Medicine, 2009)
  • Epidural steroid injections and physical therapy both seem to be effective in Lumbar spinal stenosis patients up to six months of follow-up. (Spine, 1976)